Posts Tagged ‘data privacy’

In a brief interview for Computer Weekly, Tahseen Consulting’s Wes Schwalje talks about the future of IoT and the need for regional stakeholders to get a lot more serious about personal data privacy and connected device security.

Computer Weekly: Which GCC sectors could benefit most from IoT – and why?

Schwalje: Due to the concentration of economic activity in the GCC in a handful of sectors such as the extractive industries, manufacturing, government services, construction, and utilities we will likely see a concerted effort to disrupt and digitally transform these traditional industries with IoT. Specific sub sectors of focus will likely be oil and gas, petrochemicals, aviation, and, pharmaceuticals as well as government services such as healthcare, education, and utilities. In these traditional sectors, industry incumbents will either take on new roles or be displaced by new industry structures due to digital disruption. A good example of this adaptation in the private sector to avoid digital disruption is Mashreq Bank’s recent announcement about its new digital only spin-off unit. In terms of government services, several GCC governments are deploying IoT as part of smart city initiatives to enhance government service provision, we are seeing interesting connected healthcare pilots emerging like telehealth systems in Saudi Arabia, and there is a significant push to leverage IoT to address transport challenges regionally. At the same time, increasing economic diversification in the GCC, driven primarily by growth in the services sector, is likely to lead to innovative IoT applications in emerging services sectors such as transport and logistics, telecommunications, financial services, and tourism. In the very near future, IoT will become a key aspect of GCC economic diversification strategies and ultimately global and regional competitiveness.

Computer Weekly: How might life in the GCC look different in ten years, due to IoT technology?

Schwalje: The data gained from IoT is the foundation for a range of emerging technologies such as machine learning, robotics, automation, 3D printing, artificial intelligence, and augmented. For this reason, we will see a significant uptake of IoT over the next decade. Data is quickly becoming vital to the profitability and success of GCC businesses as well as enhanced efficiency and effectiveness of government service delivery. In terms of specific applications of IoT, we are likely to see smart asset monitoring, employee tracking, energy consumption monitoring, product usage and monitoring, business process automation, smart security, and wide area control systems. While the potential of IoT in the GCC is promising, more effective, consumer-oriented laws and regulations on data in the GCC and throughout the Arab World are needed to address how data can be obtained and used, how long data can be kept, and limits on access by third or other government related-parties. A modern, harmonized GCC data protection framework is a critical requirement to maximize the benefits of the IoT.

Tahseen Consulting is honored to have its report on personal data privacy practices of financial institutions in the UAE cited by The National, one of the UAE’s largest English-language daily newspapers. In our report issued in July 2014, we found that UAE personal financial data privacy policies can be significantly improved to offer consumers more control over their personal data. Our original article is available here: http://tahseen.ae/blog/?p=974.

View Our Other Work on Data Regulations and Standards in the GCC

Is Open Data Leading to Better Government in the GCC?

Most UAE banks don’t give the right to opt out of sharing your personal information with affiliates, companies related by common ownership or third parties, Mr Schwalje adds. “So if a large bank has affiliated subsidiaries that offer private banking, financial management or insurance, all of your information can be freely shared for cross-selling services.”

Most UAE banks don’t give the right to opt out of sharing your personal information with affiliates, companies related by common ownership or third parties. If a large bank has affiliated subsidiaries that offer private banking, financial management or insurance, all of your information can be freely shared for cross-selling services.