Archive for November 2015

When it comes to news on socio-economic trends in the Arab World, government and business leaders turn to Trends Magazine. Tahseen Consulting is honored to have its insights on regulating the emergent sharing economy in the Arab World in the publication’s October issue. We have posted the full article below.

Tahseen Consulting’s Chief Operating Officer, Wes Schwalje, spoke with Nikhil Inamdar, a leading voice on key business trends in the region, regarding the evolving role the sharing economy is playing in meeting the region’s youth employment challenge. In a wide-ranging discussion, Schwalje warns of avoiding heavy-handed regulatory approaches that might limit the socio-economic impact pioneering companies in the sharing economy such as Uber and Airbnb can have on the Arab region.

Despite the negative press attention the sharing economy has received, the Arab World has largely shied away from public and government debate over the policy issues that this major growth sector highlights as it disrupts mature industries. As the sharing economy has grown, it has puzzled global policy makers who are faced with the challenge of embracing innovative, digital services which can lower costs and increase convenience for consumers while balancing the continued competitiveness of incumbent industries.

The Rapid Growth of the Sharing Economy in the Arab World

The sharing economy includes a wide range of online platforms that help people share access to assets, resources, time, and skills. While there are a growing number of regional companies that have entered the sector, the dominant players in the Arab World remain well-funded, Silicon Valley-based startups. From Marrakech to Beirut, and many cities in between, sharing economy firms have rapidly scaled their operations across the Arab World due to strong consumer demand. However, regional policymakers, for the most part, have yet to consider how to regulate the sharing economy.

The Importance of Travel and Tourism to Regional Economies and Employment
CountryTravel and Tourism Total Contribution to GDPTravel and Tourism Total Contribution to Employment
UAE8.40%9.20%
KSA7.70%11.10%
Egypt12.80%11.60%
Morocco17.90%16.00%
Lebanon21.10%20.30%
Source: World Travel and Tourism Council

Early Attempts At Regulation

In considering how to regulate the shared economy, Arab policy makers face two options: dismiss new sharing economy platforms by regulating them out of existence and retaining legislation that favors market incumbents or embrace the efficiencies the sharing economy  can bring to increase innovation and harness the growth of the shared economy to promote socio-economic growth.

Dubai is ground zero for how regulation of the sharing economy might unfold across the region. For example, in the run up to Expo 2020, Dubai is attempting to broaden its range of accommodations. One market segment that has surged in the past several years is short-term apartment rentals. Until 2013, when Decree Number 41 was introduced, short-term rentals of holiday homes were largely unregulated. The Decree made it mandatory for operators and owners who lease out their apartments on a short-term basis to attain a license from the Dubai Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing. (DTCM) In mid-2014, DTCM started accepting license applications from operators and owners. As of July 2015, a total of 37 operators and owners were licensed to rent out holiday homes in Dubai with 800 units registered.

It is unclear how Dubai’s renewed push to register holiday homes and impose fines on offenders who rent their properties without a license will ultimately affect sharing economy players operating in the short term rental sector. The licensing of holiday homes in Dubai is an example of a reactionary public policy response that could potentially erode the supply base of shared economy players in the short term rental sector by imposing a licensing process on landlords. A win-win solution which would have supported the growth of the shared economy as well as maximized government revenues would have potentially been to meet with sharing economy companies and short term rental agents to discuss how the Dubai tourism tax could be collected from intermediaries and paid directly to authorities. In France, Amsterdam, India, and the United States, sharing economy companies work with authorities to do exactly this.

A recent study suggests that the market presence of sharing economy players operating in the short term rental sector negatively impacts hotel room revenues. However, the competitive response from incumbent hotels often results in price reductions by lower-end hotels and hotels not catering to business travelers. In this respect, short term rental sharing economy firms have the potential to lead to lower consumer prices for hotel rooms as well as more flexible accommodation offerings. In so far as, lower accommodation prices can drive tourism numbers even higher, Dubai’s introduction of licensing requirements as a mechanism for regulating the sharing economy may ultimately have the unintended effect of reducing tourism by reinforcing higher accommodation prices.

Across the Arab World, overlaps between regulatory and operational functions of government institutions can result in significant inefficiency. When government entities provide a service, set delivery standards, and monitor compliance with standards, an unintended outcome is often reduced quality of public service delivery and lower service standards. This governance tradition in the Arab World has produced a number of cases in which regulatory agencies, which should be accountable to Ministries and focused on setting standards to ensure high quality public services, have become too involved in commercially motivated, operational functions. Over involvement of government institutions in operational activities has the potential to reduce the growth of the sharing economy and ultimately negatively impact consumer convenience and choice.

In association with the United Arab Emirates’ Smart Government Initiative, government agencies have been called upon to make their services accessible via smart technologies such as smart phones. The Dubai Road and Transport Authority’s (RTA) recent announcement of its e-limo system, which will require private hire vehicle operators to route transactions through its booking and dispatch system, is a potential example of a case where a government entity with a regulatory and policymaking mandate is extending itself too far into an operational role. By introducing their own limo application, which essentially competes with sharing economy transport networking companies and erodes market supply, RTA risks crowding out private sector innovation that can fuel entrepreneurship, private investment, and job creation.

Embracing the Sharing Economy for Regional Socio-economic Development

According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, travel and tourism contributes approximately $283 billion to Arab economies and employs 11 million people. This means that the contribution of the travel and tourism sector to regional gross domestic product is on par with the banking, chemicals, agriculture, and automotive sectors. It is clear that travel and tourism will play a strong role in generating economic growth and employment in the Arab World over the next decade.

The sharing economy, in so far as it is a key driver of travel and tourism, has the potential to contribute significantly to regional socio-economic development. While there have been no rigorous attempts to determine the socio-economic impact of the shared economy in the Arab World, limited data suggest that the sharing economy has a growing importance in driving the travel and tourism sector in the region. For example, 40% of Uber’s riders in Dubai come from outside the country. Statistics such as this indicate that sharing economy trends and penetration rates globally can have a significant impact on economies regionally.

A recent report on the sharing economy workforce in the United States found that 67.5% of sharing economy jobs are occupied by workers in the 18-34 age demographic. The youth employment impact of the sharing economy globally suggests that embracing the sharing economy in the Arab World could play a key role in government socio-economic development programs to address the Arab World’s youth unemployment challenge. This insight has important implications for how Arab governments should approach regulating the shared economy.

The Age of US Sharing Economy Workers
Age% Sharing Economy Workforce
18 - 2438.70%
25 - 3428.80%
35 - 4416.30%
45 - 5411.00%
55 - 644.30%
65 +0.90%
Source: Requests for Startups 2015 1099 Economy Workforce Report

The Future of the Sharing Economy in the Arab World

The future of the sharing economy in the Arab World is heavily dependent on how governments approach sector regulation. Knee jerk approaches to public policy will prevent the likely considerable positive socio-economic development impacts that can be generated by the sharing economy. In the GCC countries, entrepreneurship programs and wage subsidies offer significant potential to attract nationals and private investment to emerging sharing economy sectors that can reduce public sector employment. While in middle income Arab countries, the sharing economy can offer employment options for youth that can be combined with government finance and training programs that eventually lead to business ownership. Where other countries are limiting consumer choice by over-regulation of the shared economy, the Arab World has the opportunity to distinguish itself as a region that embraces the sharing economy through a well-considered public policy response that harnesses the sector’s potential growth for regional socio-economic development.

Unemployment By Age Group in Selected Arab Countries
AgeUAEKSAEgyptMoroccoLebanon
18-2433%52%63%42%45%
25-3432%45%36%40%32%
35-4415%3%1%12%8%
45-5412%0.50%0.06%5%8%
55-648%0.09%NA0.22%4%
65 +NANANA0.22%2%
Source: Latest available statistics from the International Labor Organization

When it comes to news on economic trends and policies in the UAE, government and business leaders turn to the Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development’s Economic Review. Tahseen Consulting is honored to contribute its analysis on the economic policy role of the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority to the publication’s November issue. We have posted the full article below.

In the article, Tahseen Consulting’s Chief Executive Officer, Walid Aradi, spoke with representatives from the Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development regarding his thoughts on the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority’s role in fiscal policy.

Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development: Who Does the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority Serve?

Aradi: Based on the constitution of the United Arab Emirates, natural resources are the public property of the Emirate in which they are located. The Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (ADIA) receives funds from the Government of Abu Dhabi and invests these funds in the public interest of the Emirate and its citizens. The process for allocating and transferring revenues to ADIA is not rule based but is based on three sources:

  • Budget surpluses, which arise from an excess of petroleum revenues, from the Government of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. This includes taxes on oil companies as well as profits from the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC)
  • Investment income from returns made by ADIA
  • ADNOC pays an undisclosed percentage of its income directly into two natural resource funds (Abu Dhabi Investment Council and the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority)

The size of the funds under the management of ADIA has been conservatively estimated at between $700 billion and $800 billion.

Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development: How is it Managed?

 Aradi: ADIA is an independent government investment institution wholly owned by the Abu Dhabi Government. However, it carries out its investment mandate independently of the Abu Dhabi Government and other institutions that also invest funds on behalf of the government. Since 2008, ADIA has made significant progress in transparency and disclosure and has participated in the formulation of the Santiago Principles and meetings of the International Forum of Sovereign Wealth Funds. Key stakeholders in the management of ADIA include:

  • Government of Abu Dhabi: The Government of Abu Dhabi established the legal mechanism for ADIA in 1976 and remains the legal owner of ADIA and its assets.
  • Board of Directors: Provides oversight over ADIA’s management. The Board’s nine members are appointed for three-year periods which are renewable. H.H. Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan serves as the Chairman of the Board.
  • Managing Director: Is responsible for investment and operational decisions and reports to the Board of Directors. The Managing Director is also a member of the Board of Directors.
  • Investment Committee: Advises the Managing Director on investment policy and external manager selection and performance.
  • Internal Audit Department: Reports to the Managing Director and the Board of Director’s Audit Committee.
  • Audit Committee: Oversees and appoints two external auditors

Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development: How is it important for the development and future of Abu Dhabi?

Aradi: ADIA plays a critical economic policy role in efficiently and effectively managing the financial wealth of the Government of Abu Dhabi. Since 1976, Abu Dhabi has maintained a prudent fiscal policy in which oil revenues were used to balance the Emirate’s budget and finance development. Surpluses are invested through ADIA and are drawn upon in times of deficit.

ADIA operates as an inter-generational savings fund with a diversified portfolio of international assets and a focus on generating long-term financial returns. Savings funds are typically utilized by countries to preserve some part of the revenues from a depleting resource for future generations and spending need. In countries that have a high degree of fiscal dependence on the export of nonrenewable resources, a key challenge is to transform nonrenewable resources into sustainable and stable sources of future income while also isolating the country from volatility in commodity prices. Placing commodity revenue in a sovereign wealth fund such as ADIA is a means to avoid boom and bust cycles, such as those we are potentially experiencing now, by accumulating adequate international assets.

ADIA is an important fiscal revenue source that allows Abu Dhabi to reduce its reliance on volatility in oil revenues. Its purpose is it to decouple Abu Dhabi Government finances from oil revenues and to maximize future spending power and to prepare the economy for a post-commodity era.

When it comes to news on economic trends and policies in the UAE, government and business leaders turn to the Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development’s Economic Review. Tahseen Consulting is honored to have its work on developing a knowledge economy in the UAE highlighted in the publication’s November issue. We have posted the full article below.

Tahseen Consulting’s Chief Operating Officer, Wes Schwalje, spoke with representatives from the Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development regarding his thoughts on how Abu Dhabi can build a knowledge economy. In a wide-ranging discussion, Schwalje discusses the link between the UAE’s knowledge-based economic development strategy and high skill, high wage job creation.

Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development: How Can Abu Dhabi Build a Knowledge Economy?

Schwalje: The development goal of transitioning to knowledge-based economies emerged in many countries in the Arab World in the late Nineties due to the commonality of several factors related to culture, the economic environment, and socio-political developments. Across the region, knowledge-based economic development has become closely intertwined with national competitiveness and economic policies that support innovation, technology development, entrepreneurship, workforce skills development, adoption of high performance organizational structures, and information and communications technology infrastructure development. It has also become associated with environmental sustainability, identity, language, gender equality, and political participation and democratic reform in some countries. Five common economic development justifications, job creation, economic integration, economic diversification, environmental sustainability, and social development, are often cited as the underlying rational for pursuing knowledge-based economic development strategies. Research conducted by Tahseen Consulting shows that seventeen of the twenty-two countries in the Arab World have the development of a knowledge-based economy specifically stated as a medium to long-term development policy objective.

Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development: How Can Knowledge-based Economic Development Strategies Lead to High Skill, High Wage Job Creation?

Schwalje: The causal relationship between knowledge-based economic development and ensuing job creation which will create the need for increased supplies of high skill workers has been particularly appealing to GCC policymakers. For Arab governments, the heavy reliance of the concept of knowledge-based economy on human capital development provides a useful means to achieve a number of attributed social and economic objectives, such as higher levels of educational attainment ; increased health; efficiency of consumer choices; higher levels of savings and charitable giving; social cohesion; increased self-reliance and economic independence; reduced crime; growth and competitiveness; increased productivity; domestic innovation.

However, with the emergence of low wage, high skills workers in developing countries, knowledge is becoming commoditized. With increasing cost competition in knowledge-based industries from emerging countries, the less resource wealthy Arab countries could feasibly follow a development trajectory grounded in selective participation in knowledge-based and manufacturing industries in which they have a cost advantage and have or can develop quickly sufficient workforce skills to compete against emerging country rivals. The Gulf countries, which employ many of their citizens in high wage roles in parastatals operating in knowledge-based industries and government institutions, may be particularly threatened by competition from low wage knowledge workers and be subject to significant margin compression which challenges the economics of their entry into knowledge-based industries.

Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development: In Which Strategic Subsectors can Abu Dhabi be Globally Competitive in the Face of the Emergence of Low Wage, High Skill Knowledge Workers?

Schwalje: The Abu Dhabi Economic Vision 2030 outlines several economic sectors for growth and diversification.

  • Energy – Oil & Gas
  • Petrochemicals
  • Metals
  • Aviation, Aerospace, and Defense
  • Pharmaceuticals, Biotechnology, & Life Sciences
  • Tourism
  • Healthcare Equipment & Services
  • Transportation, Trade, & Logistics
  • Education
  • Media
  • Financial Services
  • Telecommunication Services

An extremely important next step in moving towards a knowledge based economy will be closely scrutinizing the industries identified in the Abu Dhabi Economic Vision 2030 for particular industry subsectors that are economically viable given the emergence of low wage, high skill knowledge workers in emerging economies, have the potential to offer wages that are attractive relative to reservation wages established by the public sector, present the possibility of developing a sustainable cost advantage, and which national workforce skills can be developed to provide the human capital required to grow the industry.

For example, research on the emerging renewable energy industry in the UAE found that the majority of firms which operate in the industry are concentrated in lower value added, downstream activities like installation, maintenance, and trading. Very few firms currently operate in higher value added, knowledge intensive industry segments like manufacturing, consulting, and finance. While such industries are in an emergent stage, it is unclear, if they remain concentrated in lower value added segments, whether their impact on economic development will be as significant as planned.

Abu Dhabi Council for Economic Development: What are Some of the Challenges Faced by Countries in Developing Knowledge Economies?

A historical example from the Arab World of the perils of inadequate skills development paralleling foreign and domestic investment is Muhammad Ali’s attempt to industrialize Egypt through the establishment of a textile industry in the 1800s. In 1819, Muhammad Ali began an industrialization drive using imported foreign technicians and investment which led to the establishment of 30 modern factories for textile manufacturing. By 1830, these factories employed 30,000 but within a decade all the factories had failed due to lack of technical skills, European competition, and increased production quality in Europe. At the time, French and English technical superiority and lower labor and raw material costs allowed the Europeans to displace Egyptian imports to Europe. Egypt also faced skills shortages related to engineers and mechanics who could operate, repair, or make innovative improvements to imported technologies which led to obsolescence of Egyptian textile equipment. English free trade concessions further led to industry decline, and by the 1840s Egypt was relegated to a supplier of raw materials to the European textile industry and a net importer of finished textile products from Europe. Despite significant investment in the sector, 87% of cotton in Egypt continued to be processed with manual, time consuming, inefficient methods until 1860 when state of the art steam technologies were introduced due to favorable competitive opportunities for Egyptian cotton resulting from decreased global supply from the US during the American Civil War.

One of the key challenges we have identified in our work with Arab countries pursuing knowledge-based development strategies in the region is the lack of effectiveness of skills formation systems. Our research shows that lack of effectiveness of Arab skills formation systems influences Arab firms to contest lower-skilled, non-knowledge intensive industries at the detriment to regional competitiveness and knowledge-based economic development. Adaptability and congruence of skills formation systems and constituent actors in response to factors such as economic development, skill demands of employers, technological progress and industrial strengthening, and macroeconomic trends is critical to knowledge-based development in the Arab World. Thus, the movement of many Arab countries towards knowledge- based economic development inevitably requires the transition to more effective skills formation systems.

Our research on the region has shown four primary requirements to develop skills formation systems for knowledge economy:

Governments must link economic development with education and training

Key roles

  • Coordination: Ensuring effective institutions to prevent market failure, underinvestment in skills, provide adequate regulation, and coordinate stakeholders
  • Aligning macroeconomic policy with skills formation: Educational and industrial policy interventions must be set in place so that education and training systems co-evolve with industry development.
  • Broad-based, inclusive skills formation: National skills formation systems must support the workforce presently employed in or entering the formal sector as well as individuals who are self-employed, working in informal sectors, or unemployed.

Education and training systems must produce human capital in the quantity and quality required by the labor market

Key roles

  • Ensuring relevancy and employability: Governance, policy, and coordination mechanisms that link educational systems to specific labor market outcomes avoid supply-demand informational gaps regarding skills trends and ensure skill alignment with the needs of employers
  • Quality Assurance: Adoption of performance-oriented, rather than expansion focused, approaches to improving quality, increasing performance, and assuring student marketability
  • Expanding Access: Programs to develop skills amongst those disadvantaged by inadequate investment

Employers need to take a longer term approach to skills formation for knowledge-based development

Key roles

  • Workforce Investment: Employers must be committed to continuous, regular on the job training and knowledge transfer in response to high-performance workplace organization and skills relevancy but also remediating inadequate pre-employment general skills
  • Workforce Development: Cooperation of education and training institutions, the business community, and governments to provide individuals with gainful, rewarding employment as well as firms obtaining the skills in the quantity and quality required

Individuals must be able to make informed choices about their investments in particular skills sets and continuously upgrade their skills

Key roles

  • Investment optimization: Individuals must seek out information on the future trajectory of industries and emergent skills needs, the returns to investing in particular skills sets, returns of education and training investments when calibrating their education and training decisions
  • Lifelong-learning: Individuals must be committed to continuous learning throughout all stages of life for the purposes of community engagement, the workplace, development, and well-being

The embrace of the Smart City concept is a key cornerstone of the UAE’s national development policy. Strong government commitment has been made to the use of Information and communications technology (ICT) to transform life and work in the UAE in fundamental ways. These investments in human capital and ICT infrastructure are expected to generate sustainable economic growth as well as lead to a higher quality of life.

Developing an affordable, high-speed communications network as an infrastructure backbone to enable smart cities has long been an objective of the UAE government. In 2006, the General Policy for the Telecommunications Sector in the State of the United Arab Emirates set out the goal of providing universal, affordable access to ICT services. Though the UAE has not set specific targets for ICT access and use at the national level or specific targets for gender equity, evidence suggests that the UAE is targeting 100% access for all individuals. Based on a recent household survey conducted by the UAE Telecom Regulatory Authority, 99% of UAE nationals have mobile phones, 95% of households have computers, and 84% of households have an internet connection. These statistics point towards a universally high level of ICT access and use in the UAE with sufficient resources and will to achieve full national ICT penetration.

Broadband Affordability is An Emerging Policy Imperative

While nearly universal internet access has been achieved, an additional imperative for public leaders remains ensuring affordability. This challenge is particularly critical in enabling entrepreneurship and ensuring the global competitiveness of the nation’s small and medium-sized businesses. In a global comparison of the prices of entry-level fiber broadband packages for small and medium-sized businesses, Tahseen Consulting’s analysis shows that UAE businesses are being charged significantly more than small and medium-sized businesses globally.

Global Comparison of Entry-level Fiber Broadband Packages for Small and Medium-Sized Businesses

Doing Business RankingCountryCompanyPackageDownload SpeedCost per monthData Limit
1SingaporeSingteleVolve for SMEs30 Mbps$69.70Unlimited
2New ZealandSparkBasic Business12 Mbps$52.11200 GB
3DenmarkTDCTDC BizBase15 Mbps$43.06Unlimited
4KoreaSK BroadbandOptical LAN100 Mbps$28.62Unlimited
5Hong KongHong Kong Telecom@Work Broadband30 Mbps$38.45100 GB
6UKBritish TelecomBT Infinity Unlimited38 Mbps$48.16Unlimited
7United StatesComcastStarter16 Mbps$69.95Unlimited
8SwedenTeliaTelia Office10 Mbps$57.21Unlimited
9NorwayTelenorBroadband Enterprise6 Mbps$40.27Unlimited
10FinlandSoneraSmall BusinessUp to 200 Mbps$37.60Unlimited

An analysis of entry-level fiber broadband packages for small and medium-sized businesses in the top 10 highest ranking countries on the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Ranking shows that the average price per megabyte of download speed is $3.61 (excluding Korea and Finland which have national broadband policies that have promoted extremely fast broadband access at prices that are far cheaper than global comparators). At an average price per megabyte of download speed of approximately $18, the common entry-level fiber broadband packages offered in the UAE to small and medium-sized businesses cost 5 times more than similar packages offered in the leading countries in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Ranking. Businesses in the UAE also pay up to 2 times more than similar broadband packages offered to residential consumers.

Making Broadband More Affordable for Small and Medium-Sized Businesses

The price of broadband access for small and medium-sized businesses is critical to realizing the UAE’s smart city ambitions as well as enabling the nation’s entrepreneurs to compete effectively on a global scale. According to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), increased competition is an effective mechanism to lower prices. ITU research shows that   duopolies lead to limited price competition which can reduce prices, but markets with more than three licensed operators experience the greatest falls in prices. Policy makers can also address affordability by regular monitoring, price regulation, and tiered services that ensure the revenue maximization objectives of telecom operators are aligned with broader national development strategies. Based on an international benchmark average price per megabyte of download speed of $3.61, implied monthly fees for entry-level broadband services for small and medium-sized businesses which would align the UAE with the most business friendly countries globally are shown below.

Implied Monthly Fee Schedule for Entry-Level Broadband Packages for Small and Medium-sized Businesses Based on International Benchmarks

Download/Upload SpeedImplied Monthly Fee (AED)
10Mbps/2MbpsAED 132.49
12 Mbps/3 MbpsAED 158.98
20Mbps/5MbpsAED 264.97
24 Mbps/6 MbpsAED 317.97
40Mbps/10MbpsAED 529.95
50 Mbps/12 MbpsAED 662.44
60Mbps/15MbpsAED 794.92
72 Mbps/20 MbpsAED 953.91
100 Mbps/25 MbpsAED 1,324.87

What’s At Stake

There are a growing number of SMEs using ICT to establish and grow their businesses. The UAE is the home to several ICT-based startups in the fields of internet search, employment, group buying, payment gateways, online retail, and real estate. While national studies such as the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor have quantified the approximate rate of entrepreneurship and employment impact in the UAE, they have not focused specifically on the additionally of ICT-based businesses on economic growth and employment generation.

The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor shows that the UAE has one of the lowest rates of total entrepreneurship activity of innovation-driven economies, and only 2.3% of new ventures are medium-tech or high technology ventures. Only 14% of entrepreneurial ventures created more than 20 jobs. These rather incomplete statistics suggest that the majority of firms in the UAE do not leverage ICT as the basis for their businesses, and the low number of such technology-driven ventures may not have a significant impact on employment creation without more focused government support. A good place to start is increasing affordability of entry level broadband packages to support the nation’s emerging entrepreneurship ecosystem.

Sources for Pricing Information
Singtel (Singapore): https://smemobile.bizportal.singtel.com/business/broadband/index.jsf
Spark (New Zealand): http://www.spark.co.nz/business/shop/internet/plans-and-pricing.html
TDC (Denmark): https://erhverv.tdc.dk/loesninger/internetabonnementer
Comcast (United States): http://business.comcast.com/internet/business-internet/plans-pricing
SK Telecom (South Korea): https://biz.skbroadband.com/data/data/Page.do?retUrl=/data/data/OpticLan
Hong Kong (Hong Kong Telecom): http://www.biz.netvigator.com/eng/bc_at_work_broadband_services.php
United Kingdom (British Telecom): http://business.bt.com/broadband-and-internet/fibre-broadband/
Sweden (Telia): http://www.telia.se/foretag/losningar/produkter/telia-kontor?intcmp=foretag-telia-kontor-host2015
Norway (Telenor): http://www.telenor.no/bedrift/bredband/
Finland (Sonera): https://www.sonera.fi/yrityksille/tuotteet+ja+palvelut/internetyhteys+toimistoon/yritysinternet/
UAE (DU): http://www.du.ae/smallbusiness/fixed/broadband/broadband-professionals
UAE (Etisalat): http://www.etisalat.ae/en/business/products-and-services/products/internetdata/business-super-overview.jsp

When it comes to news on socio-economic trends in the Arab World, government and business leaders turn to Trends Magazine. Tahseen Consulting is honored to have its insights on emerging trends in Arab philanthropy featured in the publication’s September issue.

Tahseen Consulting’s Chief Operating Officer, Wes Schwalje, spoke with Nikhil Inamdar, a leading voice on key business trends in the region, regarding the region’s transition from charity to strategic philanthropy. In a wide-ranging discussion, Schwalje discusses recently launched large scale philanthropic initiatives, emerging trends in strategic philanthropy, and what the future holds for Arab philanthropy.

Tahseen Consulting's insights on emerging trends in Arab philanthropy are featured in Trends Magazine's September issue

Tahseen Consulting’s insights on emerging trends in Arab philanthropy are featured in Trends Magazine’s September issue.

Nikhil Inamdar: What are the latest trends being witnessed in Arab philanthropy?

Schwalje: The three most transformative trends I see now are as follows:

High Net Worth Individuals Are Playing an Increasing Role: In 2010, Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffet and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates established the Giving Pledge to persuade American billionaires to donate at least half their wealth to philanthropy or charitable causes either during their lifetime or after their death. This initiative has since been broadened to include philanthropists globally. In 2012, Tahseen Consulting conducted a study in which we looked at the potential impact of Arab billionaires signing the giving pledge. At the time, we estimated that $24 billion could be mobilized if Arab billionaires signed a pledge to donate their wealth to philanthropy. While many high net worth individuals have a strong tradition of giving informally, we are witnessing more wealthy Arab individuals making large scale philanthropic contributions transparently and publicly. Their motivations are no different from philanthropists in other parts of the world – wanting to give back to those less fortunate, gaining public recognition and social capital, establishing a legacy, and playing a greater role in shaping their country’s or region’s future. The $1.1 billion donation of Abdullah Ahmad Al Ghurair to capitalize a private foundation and Prince Al Waleed bin Talal’s pledge to direct most of his $32 billion in wealth to philanthropy, we are potentially witnessing a new phase of Arab philanthropy. We are likely to see several more of the Arab World’s approximately 36 or so billionaires making sizable pledge to philanthropic initiatives to strategically manage their wealth for the greater good.

The Transition from Charity to Strategic Philanthropy: In the past, charity in the Arab World was motivated by individual, unpublicized initiatives to give back to local communities. Giving was often focused on societal issues affecting local communities like poverty, housing, and heath care. Arab philanthropy historically has been individually motivated acts of kindness that did not typically address the root cause of societal issues. In the late 2000s, we witnessed a significant push in the region to institutionalize charity, philanthropy, and corporate social responsibility to make philanthropic efforts more strategic. This push towards philanthropic investment and strategic philanthropy remains rooted in the region’s religious traditions of Zakat and Waqf. In the early 2000s, many philanthropic efforts could still be characterized as donations to fund program execution by nonprofits. Philanthropists were primarily concerned about programmatic execution commensurate with the size of their donation with little regard for measuring impact and enhancing institutional capacity. A pivotal watershed occurred in 2007 when Sheikh Mohammed donated $10 billion to endow his namesake foundation the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Foundation. The scope of this philanthropic gesture catalyzed a number of dialogues in the region about strategic philanthropy. The late 2000s saw the emergence of a number of endowed foundations in the region that began investing resources into nonprofit enterprises in order to increase their capacity to address the root causes of regional development challenges. By 2015, a number of the initiatives launched in the early 2000s and earlier have adopted strategic approaches to philanthropy which involve building internal capacities to deliver programs, developing the institutional capacities of nonprofit partners and grant recipients, pursuing programs with well thought out approaches that address the root causes of development issues, and strong systems of monitoring and evaluation to measure impact and value for money.

Arab Philanthropy is Playing an Increasingly Important Role in Global Development: Many of the region’s philanthropic institutions have become involved in international development and engage regularly with multilateral institutions and bilateral donors. Increasingly large Arab philanthropic initiatives have been able to shape the policies of multilaterals and bilateral institutions through their funding, provide input on program design and development, and contribute funding for scaling up successful initiatives.

Nikhil Inamdar: What distinguishes Arab philanthropy from global philanthropy?

Schwalje: In addition to the relationship between philanthropic giving and religious traditions, a unique aspect of philanthropy in some of the Arab countries is the emergence of hybrid foundations which are funded by government or quasi-governmental funds and private donors. In other regions, public charities generally receive their funding from the public through grants from individuals, government, and private foundations, while private foundation generally receive funds from a single source, such as an individual, family, or corporation. In this respect, the definition of what constitutes a charitable organization and to whom it should be held accountable is not as clear cut as elsewhere. Adding to this confusion is the fact that many of the region’s philanthropists wear multiple hats in business and government.

Nikhil Inamdar: What will need to happen in terms of regulation etc. for this segment to mature like the way it has in Western economies like the US?

Schwalje: In many Arab countries, civil society laws make the registering of philanthropic organizations immensely difficult and can preclude fund raising. Such laws have the potential to negatively influence the development of civil society. Laws which might also serve to motivate individual giving and corporate philanthropy, such as tax deductible charitable giving, are also lacking. Emerging forms of philanthropy, such as venture philanthropy and crowdfunding, currently exist in regulatory grey areas which require regulation to ensure they can thrive in the region.

Nikhil Inamdar: Does philanthropy need to become more organized in terms of impact assessment, audit etc. so as to give the sector a more formal structure?

Schwalje: Several elements are required to Advance Arab Philanthropy:

Mapping Giving Patterns: More effort is needed to map philanthropic giving to determine what entities are giving and to whom in order to identify unmet needs. An interesting initial attempt to map private philanthropic contributions is the UAE’s Annual Foreign Aid Reports which included information on giving by many of the UAE’s philanthropic organizations. More information on giving patterns with promote coordination and reduce overlap of efforts.

A Focus on Improving Delivery Capabilities of Beneficiaries Linked to Funding: In many cases, regional nonprofits lack the capabilities and internal controls to absorb and manage large-scale donor contributions. This has promoted a tendency of Arab philanthropists to work with international organizations over home-grown Arab institutions. Capacity strengthening of Arab donor recipients linked to philanthropic contributions will be required to strengthen the region’s civils society institutions to deliver more effectively on large-scale initiatives and attract larger philanthropic donations.

Improved Capabilities to Analyze Value for Money: Because of the youth of strategic philanthropy in the region, there are several organizational capabilities that philanthropic organizations need to improve. This includes identifying program objectives to determine the strategic intent and envisioned impact of initiatives, examining the ongoing relevance and validity of programs, ensuring efficiency and economy of activities, and assessing the impact of programming.

While Saudi Arabia’s publishing industry faces challenges, there are significant opportunities to revitalize the sector for socio-economic development says a new study by Tahseen Consulting

If Saudi Arabia addresses key industry challenges, the publishing, media, and digital content industries could generate $3.6 billion and create 9,800 additional jobs by 2017, says a new study from Tahseen Consulting.

The study, which is being released today, was conducted to support the Saudi Publishers Association’s recent successful bid to gain full membership in the International Publishers Association. Saudi Arabia is the fourth country in the Arab World to achieve full membership in this prestigious international organization which represents publishers’ interests globally. The report comes as Saudi publishers are preparing to attend the 34th Sharjah International Book Fair starting on November 4th.

“Since 1990, Saudi Arabia’s publishing industry has changed dramatically. In the early to mid -Nineties, the industry was dominated by small, fragmented publishers and specialized retailers,” says Wes Schwalje, Chief Operating Officer of Tahseen Consulting and author of the study. “By the mid-Nineties, we began to observe the emergence of integrated companies specialized in publishing and retail. There was a large shift from small bookshops to major super-stores with national coverage and the initial emergence of online retail channels that cater to emerging preferences for e-books and digital content. Today, we are witnessing the further growth of large, integrated companies with publishing and distribution capabilities, increased consumption of digital content due to high levels of mobile device penetration, and the embrace of e-commerce by Saudi publishers and consumers.”

The Saudi Publishing Industry Will Need to Address Several Challenges

Tahseen Consulting’s study shows that the publishing, media, and digital content industries will need to address a number of challenges to unlock growth. While the Saudi publishing industry currently contributes less than 1% of GDP, international evidence suggests that cultural industries can contribute up to 2-3% of GDP. If the publishing media, and digital content industries can reach this international benchmark, the cultural industries in Saudi Arabia could contribute significantly to economic diversification and employment generation.

The study identifies the need for a government-led national publishing strategy that prioritizes needs and challenges, identifies strategies for advancing the industry, assigns responsibilities, defines performance metrics, and establishes an implementation timeline. Several specific recommendations for policymakers are made by the authors to enable industry growth:

  • Stimulating private investment in the publishing, media, and content industries
  • Increasing exports of publishing, media, and digital content regionally
  • Increasing education and training programs to developing creative industry skills
  • Encouraging publishers to embrace digital publishing and online sales
  • Improving industry data collection and analysis
  • Making major book fairs more appealing to families
  • Developing more targeted reading promotion programs
  • Increasing early positive reading habits
  • Developing a strategy to transform libraries
  • Simplifying the licensing and regulatory regime for publishers
  • Improving copyright protection and enforcement

“While a number of institutions, awards, and festivals seek to build literary culture in Saudi Arabia, there are no specific polices for the development of the publishing industry. To succeed in the evolving global publishing market, Saudi publishers will need to be supported to become more open to change, adapt to evolving digital formats, and embrace online distribution strategies,” says Walid Aradi, Chief Executive Officer of Tahseen Consulting and a coauthor of the study.

Increasing Internationalization of the Saudi Publishing Industry

As a full member of the International Publishing Association, the Saudi government and industry bodies now have a much larger responsibility to publishers and the global community to address industry challenges and to unlock opportunities presented by industry internationalization and growth. If industry challenges are addressed proactively by key stakeholders, the publishing, media, and digital content industries hold great potential in contributing to Saudi and regional intellectual life, enhancing social and cultural development, and providing economic opportunity.